/ before
389 notesReblog 
A través de Flickr: These Tokugawa-era swords (or sham swords, in the case of the silver-carrier at the top) were used for the safe transport of high value money.

From the Edo or Tokugawa period of Japanese history, which was ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family, running from 1603 to 1868.

A través de Flickr:
These Tokugawa-era swords (or sham swords, in the case of the silver-carrier at the top) were used for the safe transport of high value money.

From the Edo or Tokugawa period of Japanese history, which was ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family, running from 1603 to 1868.

37 notesReblog tatsukii:

日本最古の星野写真の発見
“もともと国立天文台は、かつての東京帝国大学東京天文台として19世紀に設立され、東京都心・麻布において、様々な観測に着手していました。しかし、当時の資料や観測装置、乾板類などは、現在の三鷹の地へ移転する前の関東大震災や、戦中にあった三鷹の東京天文台本館の火災などで喪失したと思われていました。今回、発見したのは、麻布時代にブラッシャー天体写真儀(注2)によって撮影された、日本最古の星野写真乾板群です。 […] 20cmトロートン・シムス望遠鏡に同架されたブラッシャー天体写真儀”

Roughly translated:
“The discovery of Japan’s oldest picture Hoshino     National Astronomical Observatory, founded in the 19th century as an observatory of Tokyo Imperial University in Tokyo of the past, in Azabu, central Tokyo, had embarked on various observations. However, observation equipment and materials at the time, and Louis plates originally "is was thought to have lost such as fire and the Great Kanto Earthquake of prior to transfer to the land of Mitaka for the current Main astronomical Observatory of Tokyo, Mitaka was during the war. this time, it was discovered, astrograph Blusher era linen was taken by (Note 2), is a group of Japan’s oldest photographic plates Hoshino.     […]     Astrograph Blusher is the same rack 20cm telescope Toroton Sims " "

tatsukii:

日本最古の星野写真の発見

“もともと国立天文台は、かつての東京帝国大学東京天文台として19世紀に設立され、東京都心・麻布において、様々な観測に着手していました。しかし、当時の資料や観測装置、乾板類などは、現在の三鷹の地へ移転する前の関東大震災や、戦中にあった三鷹の東京天文台本館の火災などで喪失したと思われていました。今回、発見したのは、麻布時代にブラッシャー天体写真儀(注2)によって撮影された、日本最古の星野写真乾板群です。
[…]
20cmトロートン・シムス望遠鏡に同架されたブラッシャー天体写真儀”

Roughly translated:

The discovery of Japan’s oldest picture Hoshino

     National Astronomical Observatory, founded in the 19th century as an observatory of Tokyo Imperial University in Tokyo of the past, in Azabu, central Tokyo, had embarked on various observations. However, observation equipment and materials at the time, and Louis plates originally "is was thought to have lost such as fire and the Great Kanto Earthquake of prior to transfer to the land of Mitaka for the current Main astronomical Observatory of Tokyo, Mitaka was during the war. this time, it was discovered, astrograph Blusher era linen was taken by (Note 2), is a group of Japan’s oldest photographic plates Hoshino.
     […]
     Astrograph Blusher is the same rack 20cm telescope Toroton Sims " "

0 notesReblog Postcard by Kawahara Keiga of Nagasaki Japan, circa 1820.

Postcard by Kawahara Keiga of Nagasaki Japan, circa 1820.

64 notesReblog  Rebus for the names of Japanese provinces, circa 1800.

Rebus for the names of Japanese provinces, circa 1800.

futurejournalismproject:

This Day in History: Executive Order 9066 & Japanese Internment Camps

On February 19, 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 allowing the US military to create domestic exclusion zones and remove people from them.

“Within days,” the Los Angeles Times reminds us, “the military began removing all Japanese Americans and Japanese from the West Coast.

“Within months, about 110,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans – almost two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens –were moved to internment camps scattered through eastern California, Arizona and other Western States.”

The LA Times Framework blog has a great slideshow of the images they published at that time.

Images: Lead image is a sign notifying people of Japanese descent to report for relocation, via Wikipedia. Photos via the LA Times Framework blog.


(9:02am)
4 notesReblog Great Chilean Earthquake damage at Shiogama, Japan.
The Great Chilean Earthquake on 22 May 1960 is to date the most powerful earthquake ever recorded on Earth, rating 9.5. The resulting tsunami affected southern Chile, Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, eastern New Zealand, southeast Australia, and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. 

Great Chilean Earthquake damage at Shiogama, Japan.

The Great Chilean Earthquake on 22 May 1960 is to date the most powerful earthquake ever recorded on Earth, rating 9.5. The resulting tsunami affected southern Chile, Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, eastern New Zealand, southeast Australia, and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. 

53 notesReblog harvestheart:

ANCIENT MARKERS IN JAPAN - 
“High dwellings are the peace and harmony of our descendants,” reads the centuries-old stone tablet above. “Remember the calamity of the great tsunamis. Do not build any homes below this point.”
This marker, and several more like it, some more than 600 years old, “dot the coastline” of Japan, according to a report in The Canadian Press. Not all of them were quite as specific: Some acted more as general warnings, lasting reminders of a risk that might only recur every fourth or fifth generation.
One, in the coastal town of Kesennuma, gave instructions: “Always be prepared for unexpected tsunamis. Choose life over your possessions and valuables.” Another, in the city of Natori, simply advised, “If an earthquake comes, beware of tsunamis.” This was a warning that not everybody heeded: in Natori, where 820 bodies have been found and 1,000 people are still missing, people still left “work early after the earthquake, some picking up their children at school en route, to check the condition of their homes near the coast.”
But in the tight-knit community of Aneyoshi, where marker pictured above still stands, the wisdom of their ancestors saved the homes and the lives of the tiny village’s inhabitants. All of Aneyoshi’s houses are built on higher ground, and 12-year-old resident Yuto Kimura explained to The Canadian Press:

Everybody here knows about the markers. We studied them in school. When the tsunami came, my mom got me from school and then the whole village climbed to higher ground.

Image via the Star-Telegram; story via @stevesilberman.

harvestheart:

ANCIENT MARKERS IN JAPAN - 

“High dwellings are the peace and harmony of our descendants,” reads the centuries-old stone tablet above. “Remember the calamity of the great tsunamis. Do not build any homes below this point.”

This marker, and several more like it, some more than 600 years old, “dot the coastline” of Japan, according to a report in The Canadian Press. Not all of them were quite as specific: Some acted more as general warnings, lasting reminders of a risk that might only recur every fourth or fifth generation.

One, in the coastal town of Kesennuma, gave instructions: “Always be prepared for unexpected tsunamis. Choose life over your possessions and valuables.” Another, in the city of Natori, simply advised, “If an earthquake comes, beware of tsunamis.” This was a warning that not everybody heeded: in Natori, where 820 bodies have been found and 1,000 people are still missing, people still left “work early after the earthquake, some picking up their children at school en route, to check the condition of their homes near the coast.”

But in the tight-knit community of Aneyoshi, where marker pictured above still stands, the wisdom of their ancestors saved the homes and the lives of the tiny village’s inhabitants. All of Aneyoshi’s houses are built on higher ground, and 12-year-old resident Yuto Kimura explained to The Canadian Press:

Everybody here knows about the markers. We studied them in school. When the tsunami came, my mom got me from school and then the whole village climbed to higher ground.

Image via the Star-Telegram; story via @stevesilberman.

68 notesReblog ikenbot:

Japan’s Kounotori2 Supply Ship Approaches the Space Station

ikenbot:

Japan’s Kounotori2 Supply Ship Approaches the Space Station

jtotheizzoe:

Scientists Germinate 2,000 Year-Old Seed … It Actually Grows

I can’t even keep a freakin’ herb garden alive and these guys are growing Magnolia Kobus via nearly-fossilized seeds found among dead rice in a Japanese village. Funny thing happened when they grew it up: It looked different than its descendants do today.

A consequence of “time-travel damage”? Or a look into the past? Who knows? I’ll let David Attenborough tell you the rest …

(video via ratdavid9)

(8:13am)
233 notesReblog suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Menuki in the form of a Shishi, gold/shakudo/silver, c. 1790.

suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Menuki in the form of a Shishi, gold/shakudo/silver, c. 1790.

34 notesReblog suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Tsuba (Sword Fitting), ivory/tortoiseshell/abalone/lacquer/silver/iron, c. 1880.

suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Tsuba (Sword Fitting), ivory/tortoiseshell/abalone/lacquer/silver/iron, c. 1880.

49 notesReblog centuriespast:

No 115 Oji Shozoku enoki Omisoka kitsunebi 王子装束えの木大晦日の狐火 / Meisho Edo hyakkei 名所江戸百景
 Fox-fires on New Year’s Eve at Shozoku Enoki, trees. 1 of 2.
Meisho Edo hyakkei Print artist Utagawa Hiroshige 
1857
The British Museum

centuriespast:

No 115 Oji Shozoku enoki Omisoka kitsunebi 王子装束えの木大晦日の狐火 / Meisho Edo hyakkei 名所江戸百景

 Fox-fires on New Year’s Eve at Shozoku Enoki, trees. 1 of 2.

Meisho Edo hyakkei 
Print artist Utagawa Hiroshige 

1857

The British Museum

217 notesReblog lalitab:

Helmet (Suji Kabuto), Muromachi period, 15th centuryJapanLacquered iron, silk, stenciled leather, gilt copper
The bowl is inscribed with the character Kami (or Tatematsuru), used by the Haruta school of armorers in Nara. The badge on the turnbacks of the neck guard is that of the Sanada family, daimyo of Ueda.

lalitab:

Helmet (Suji Kabuto), Muromachi period, 15th century
Japan
Lacquered iron, silk, stenciled leather, gilt copper

The bowl is inscribed with the character Kami (or Tatematsuru), used by the Haruta school of armorers in Nara. The badge on the turnbacks of the neck guard is that of the Sanada family, daimyo of Ueda.

19 notesReblog suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Fishing Village Scene Okimono, ivory, c. 20th c.
I love the net!

suchasensualdestroyer:

Japan, Fishing Village Scene Okimono, ivory, c. 20th c.

I love the net!

23 notesReblog kimonoworld:

flowery obi

kimonoworld:

flowery obi