247 notesReblog yourathenaeum:

Augusta Braxton Baker, librarian with The New York Public Library from 1937 to 1974, blowing out the story hour candle. Baker was a devoted storyteller who developed a groundbreaking list of stories that portrayed African Americans positively and established a collection of African American children’s literature at the New York Public Library. She became the first African American coordinator of Children’s Services at the NYPL in 1961, in charge of youth programming at all eighty-three branches. Her influence touched New York libraries, schools, community groups, the American Library Association, Sesame Street, and the works of authors like Madeleine L’Engle and Maurice Sendak. World-renowned novelist James Baldwin was one of the young men who sat in the children’s room at her first library job at the 135th St Branch. She was born on this day, April 1st, in 1911. You can read more about her life and legacy from the New York Public Library, Wikipedia, and the University of South Carolina. Hear her interviewed and see more photographs of her at work at Speaking of History.

yourathenaeum:

Augusta Braxton Baker, librarian with The New York Public Library from 1937 to 1974, blowing out the story hour candle. Baker was a devoted storyteller who developed a groundbreaking list of stories that portrayed African Americans positively and established a collection of African American children’s literature at the New York Public Library. She became the first African American coordinator of Children’s Services at the NYPL in 1961, in charge of youth programming at all eighty-three branches. Her influence touched New York libraries, schools, community groups, the American Library Association, Sesame Street, and the works of authors like Madeleine L’Engle and Maurice Sendak. World-renowned novelist James Baldwin was one of the young men who sat in the children’s room at her first library job at the 135th St Branch.

She was born on this day, April 1st, in 1911. You can read more about her life and legacy from the New York Public Library, Wikipedia, and the University of South Carolina. Hear her interviewed and see more photographs of her at work at Speaking of History.

28 notesReblog lourania:

London Library After the Blitz

lourania:

London Library After the Blitz

Fiction is a kind of compassion-generating machine that saves us from sloth. Is life kind or cruel? Yes, Literature answers. Are people good or bad? You bet, says Literature. But unlike other systems of knowing, Literature declines to eradicate one truth in favor of another; rather, it teaches us to abide with the fact that, in their own way, all things are true, and helps us, in the face of this terrifying knowledge, continually push ourselves in the direction of Open the Hell Up.

George Saunders (Thank you, wait-what?devilduck)

Exactly!

(8:28am)
If you want to write, if you want to create, you must be the most sublime fool that God ever turned out and sent rambling. You must write every single day of your life. You must read dreadful dumb books and glorious books, and let them wrestle in beautiful fights inside your head, vulgar one moment, brilliant the next. You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads. I wish you a wrestling match with your Creative Muse that will last a lifetime. I wish craziness and foolishness and madness upon you. May you live with hysteria, and out of it make fine stories — science fiction or otherwise. Which finally means, may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.

Ray Bradbury (via thechocolatebrigade)

(8:28am)
I See Dead People's Books--The Legacy Libraries on LibraryThing ↘

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Complete catalogs of the personal library holdings of WH Auden, Jeff Buckley, ee cummings, Theodore Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Ralph Ellison, Hemingway, and many, many more.

So interesting…

(9:06am)
The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov

f-f-t-t:

The complete short works, 65 short stories, in .epub format.

This collection gathers every short story written by V.N., including those originally written in Russian, those he wrote later in life in the English language, and also his single story written in French (Mademoiselle O). 

Nabokov’s short fiction works are like tiny, daunting puzzles. They dare you to attempt to unravel their linguistic and structural complexities, only luring you further down the rabbit hole.

Read More

(8:40am)
I know because I read…Your mind is not a cage. It’s a garden. And it requires cultivating.

— Libba Bray (via dirtcrumbgoddess)

(8:39am)
77 notesReblog uchicagoadmissions:

Love to read? Us too. 

uchicagoadmissions:

Love to read? Us too. 

I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.

Jorge Luis Borges

(12:05pm)
3 notesReblog a wonderful read…

a wonderful read…