/ before
9,013 notesReblog alpenstrasse:

Tea bag cookies

SO clever.

alpenstrasse:

Tea bag cookies

SO clever.

311 notesReblog npr:

Some morning food for thought.
Take Time To Savor The Borek, A Flaky Turkish Snack
It seems that almost every country knows how to snack better than we do. We grab coffee and a muffin from a drive-through, or mindlessly reach into the chip bag while staring at the screen on our desk. I recently visited a friend in Spain’s Basque country who pointed out, with disdain, the lone cafe in his town that would give you coffee in a to-go cup rather than the standard little demitasse. The idea that you wouldn’t have a few minutes to sit and fully appreciate a cup of coffee and a little snack, either with a friend or the daily paper, was nearly unfathomable.
I hear where he’s coming from. Every now and then, when I catch myself wolfing something down without even registering (let alone appreciating) it, or forgoing breaks altogether, I make a mental note to make up for it. With a proper cup of tea, a proper moment of respite. A proper borek.
Borek are delicious little turnovers from Turkey, the country that invented the meze (well, the word, anyway). In fine Ottoman fashion, Turks are known for putting out table-groaning displays of little bites, from tangy thick yogurt to savory stuffed vegetables. However, as a fan of all things wrapped in dough, I gravitate toward borek. -Deena Prichep

I love börek! AKA spanakopita in Greece. Yum.

npr:

Some morning food for thought.

Take Time To Savor The Borek, A Flaky Turkish Snack

It seems that almost every country knows how to snack better than we do. We grab coffee and a muffin from a drive-through, or mindlessly reach into the chip bag while staring at the screen on our desk. I recently visited a friend in Spain’s Basque country who pointed out, with disdain, the lone cafe in his town that would give you coffee in a to-go cup rather than the standard little demitasse. The idea that you wouldn’t have a few minutes to sit and fully appreciate a cup of coffee and a little snack, either with a friend or the daily paper, was nearly unfathomable.

I hear where he’s coming from. Every now and then, when I catch myself wolfing something down without even registering (let alone appreciating) it, or forgoing breaks altogether, I make a mental note to make up for it. With a proper cup of tea, a proper moment of respite. A proper borek.

Borek are delicious little turnovers from Turkey, the country that invented the meze (well, the word, anyway). In fine Ottoman fashion, Turks are known for putting out table-groaning displays of little bites, from tangy thick yogurt to savory stuffed vegetables. However, as a fan of all things wrapped in dough, I gravitate toward borek. -Deena Prichep

I love börek! AKA spanakopita in Greece. Yum.

50 notesReblog Today’s “why-hasn’t-someone-made-this-before!?” great idea:
The Ribbon - a silicone modular band that can be bent to any shape to form a baking pan with the Teflon baking sheet to which it magnetically attaches.

Today’s “why-hasn’t-someone-made-this-before!?” great idea:

The Ribbon - a silicone modular band that can be bent to any shape to form a baking pan with the Teflon baking sheet to which it magnetically attaches.

800 notesReblog ilovecharts:

Organic Vs Conventional

ilovecharts:

Organic Vs Conventional

18 notesReblog
2,997 notesReblog bakingforgood:

pretty safe to say we could use a cabinet full of these. 

bakingforgood:

pretty safe to say we could use a cabinet full of these. 

1,782 notesReblog balancepath:

I have seen this numerous times. Love it, and will make it.

brilliant.

balancepath:

I have seen this numerous times. Love it, and will make it.

brilliant.

5,522 notesReblog
3,812 notesReblog bythegardenandthesea:

these edible sugar doilies may just be the most feminine and adorable food items on the face of this earth.

bythegardenandthesea:

these edible sugar doilies may just be the most feminine and adorable food items on the face of this earth.

Does the statement “Large, persistent populations of genetically engineered canola 1 have been found outside of cultivation in North Dakota” scare you? A new study led by Cynthia Sagers of the University of Arkansas shows that 45% of roadside canola sampled contains genetically modified (GM) or genetically engineered (GE) traits. These plants have established populations that reproduce year after year, sometimes combining multiple man-made genetic traits. The GMO genie is very clearly out of the bottle.

GMO crop gone wild | Care2 Causes

AS if that isnt bad enough…  When those airborne seeds land on property owned by farmers who didn’t buy it, good ole Monsanto will sue them.  Yes, they will, they have done it before

(via stopkillingourworld)

(8:46am)

Food is a key driver of climate change. How our food gets produced and how it ends up on our tables accounts for around half of all human-generated greenhouse gas emissions.The impact of the food industry includes destroying forests and savannahs to produce animal feed and generating climate-damaging waste through excess packaging, processing, refrigeration and the transport of food over long distances, despite leaving millions of people hungry.


A new food system could be a key driver of solutions to climate change. If measures are taken to restructure agriculture and the larger food system around food sovereignty, small scale farming, agro-ecology and local markets, we could cut global emissions in half within a few decades. We don’t need carbon markets or techno-fixes. We need the right policies and programmes to dump the current industrial food system and create a sustainable, equitable and truly productive one instead.

(10:55am)
208 notesReblog jtotheizzoe:

Plant RNAs Found in mammals … you are what you eat, apparently?
MicroRNA (miRNAs) are small molecules of RNA that affect everything from viral infection to gene expression levels. They are an ancient and unique way to control how other nucleic acids behave in cells.
It now appears that miRNAs from plants can cross over into their mammalian consumers, ending up in their cells. They might even inhibit some of the plant-eater’s genes, as was seen for a rice miRNA and a low-density lipoprotein-related gene.
A very surprising discovery, for sure, but more work will have to be done to figure out if these miRNAs actually have a function in the cells of their consumers.
(via The Scientist)

jtotheizzoe:

Plant RNAs Found in mammals … you are what you eat, apparently?

MicroRNA (miRNAs) are small molecules of RNA that affect everything from viral infection to gene expression levels. They are an ancient and unique way to control how other nucleic acids behave in cells.

It now appears that miRNAs from plants can cross over into their mammalian consumers, ending up in their cells. They might even inhibit some of the plant-eater’s genes, as was seen for a rice miRNA and a low-density lipoprotein-related gene.

A very surprising discovery, for sure, but more work will have to be done to figure out if these miRNAs actually have a function in the cells of their consumers.

(via The Scientist)

309 notesReblog ffoodd:

alligator bread (by soup & sunday)

ffoodd:

alligator bread (by soup & sunday)

103 notesReblog e-pic:

Heffer Pitcher by Chiasso

e-pic:

Heffer Pitcher by Chiasso