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10 notesReblog Portrait of the Tianqi emperor (1620-1627) of the Ming Dynasty (AD 1368 - 1644) of China in court costume. Hanging scroll, colors on silk. Palace Museum, Beijing.

Portrait of the Tianqi emperor (1620-1627) of the Ming Dynasty (AD 1368 - 1644) of China in court costume. Hanging scroll, colors on silk. Palace Museum, Beijing.

38 notesReblog whatismyanmar:

Myanmar Minister’s military court costume, 1878-1885
This ceremonial military costume of gold encrusted green and plum velvet was specially styled for a minister who served King Thibaw (r.1878-1885), the last king of the Konbaung Dynasty, at the Court of Mandalay. Consisting of a long fitted robe, separate sleeveless jacket and spectacular “cloud collar”. The quality of the velvet, its colour and degree of gold decoration defined the minister’s rank, which he had been awarded by the King.

whatismyanmar:

Myanmar Minister’s military court costume, 1878-1885

This ceremonial military costume of gold encrusted green and plum velvet was specially styled for a minister who served King Thibaw (r.1878-1885), the last king of the Konbaung Dynasty, at the Court of Mandalay. Consisting of a long fitted robe, separate sleeveless jacket and spectacular “cloud collar”. The quality of the velvet, its colour and degree of gold decoration defined the minister’s rank, which he had been awarded by the King.

52 notesReblog miaomiaomiaomiao:

the-next-emperor:

Miao girl. 苗族. The Miao is one of China’s 56 ethnic groups. The traditional headdresses and necklaces are often in silver for girls.

Lei Ayouduo

A reflection of the sad reality for minorities in China from Wiki: “The Miao is an ethnic group recognized by the government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) as one of the 55 official minority groups. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component nations of people, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Chinese government has grouped these people and other non-Miao peoples together as one group, whose members may not necessarily be either linguistically or culturally related. For this reason, many Miao peoples can not communicate with each other, and have different histories and cultures. Some groups designated as Miao by the PRC do not even agree that they belong to the ethnic group.”

miaomiaomiaomiao:

the-next-emperor:

Miao girl. 苗族. The Miao is one of China’s 56 ethnic groups. The traditional headdresses and necklaces are often in silver for girls.

Lei Ayouduo

A reflection of the sad reality for minorities in China from Wiki: “The Miao is an ethnic group recognized by the government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) as one of the 55 official minority groups. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component nations of people, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Chinese government has grouped these people and other non-Miao peoples together as one group, whose members may not necessarily be either linguistically or culturally related. For this reason, many Miao peoples can not communicate with each other, and have different histories and cultures. Some groups designated as Miao by the PRC do not even agree that they belong to the ethnic group.”

40 notesReblog legrandcirque:


Pascal Sebah,  Bedouin from the province of Halep, Turkey, 1873.
Source: Library of Congress

legrandcirque:

Pascal Sebah, Bedouin from the province of Halep, Turkey, 1873.

Source: Library of Congress

77 notesReblog Chief Bone Necklace of the Oglala Lakota photographed in 1899 by Heyn Photo.

Chief Bone Necklace of the Oglala Lakota photographed in 1899 by Heyn Photo.

277 notesReblog sisterwolf:

GIrl from Lebanon -Tancrede Dumas , 1875

sisterwolf:

GIrl from Lebanon -Tancrede Dumas , 1875

45 notesReblog legrandcirque:

A Klickitat Brave. Photograph by Benjamin A. Gifford, 1899.
Source: Oregon State University

legrandcirque:

A Klickitat Brave. Photograph by Benjamin A. Gifford, 1899.

Source: Oregon State University

389 notesReblog amazingasia:

Dilşadı  — Azerbaijan Amazing Asia

amazingasia:

Dilşadı — Azerbaijan


Amazing Asia

542 notesReblog lostsplendor:

Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich, c. 1903 (via Costume Ball in the Winter Palace)

lostsplendor:

Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich, c. 1903 (via Costume Ball in the Winter Palace)

7 notesReblog Fantasia at Beni Drar in the region of Oujda, Morocco, region Oriental.

Fantasia at Beni Drar in the region of Oujda, Morocco, region Oriental.

1,215 notesReblog phobs-heh:

 Vasily Vereshchagin. The Doors of Timur.

phobs-heh:

Vasily Vereshchagin. The Doors of Timur.

298 notesReblog culturalcrosspollination:

Tibetan monk 

culturalcrosspollination:

Tibetan monk 

63 notesReblog harvestheart:

Falconers/Horsemen of Mongolia

harvestheart:

Falconers/Horsemen of Mongolia

oldrags:

Costumes worn to the Romanov Anniversary Ball in 1903.  The theme of the lavish masked ball was the reign of Alexei of Russia, second ruler of the Romanov dynasty (1645-1676).  Some guests went so far as to actually wear original costumes from the period that were being stored at the Kremlin.

Click thumbnails for identification.


(4:07pm)
2,494 notesReblog thinkmexican:

11 Year-Old Carries on Family’s Aztec Dance Tradition
San Francisco Mission District resident Connie Xochiquetzalli “Xochi” Peña has been an Aztec dancer all her life.
As a 2 year-old, she danced an entire parade route. Now 11, Xochi sometimes steps in for her mother and teaches dance class at the Mission Cultural Center.
She comes from a long line of Aztec dancers. Her great-grandfather on her mother’s side was also a dancer in her family’s native Touca, Estado de Mexico.
Xochi has big plans for herself, ones that include practicing either law or medicine. If dancing parade routes as a toddler and teacher classes while still in the sixth grade is any indication, we’re sure she can do anything she sets her mind to.
via SF Gate
Photo: Rod Yip/The Chronicle

thinkmexican:

11 Year-Old Carries on Family’s Aztec Dance Tradition

San Francisco Mission District resident Connie Xochiquetzalli “Xochi” Peña has been an Aztec dancer all her life.

As a 2 year-old, she danced an entire parade route. Now 11, Xochi sometimes steps in for her mother and teaches dance class at the Mission Cultural Center.

She comes from a long line of Aztec dancers. Her great-grandfather on her mother’s side was also a dancer in her family’s native Touca, Estado de Mexico.

Xochi has big plans for herself, ones that include practicing either law or medicine. If dancing parade routes as a toddler and teacher classes while still in the sixth grade is any indication, we’re sure she can do anything she sets her mind to.

via SF Gate

Photo: Rod Yip/The Chronicle